Bangladesh Agricultural Development Corporation (BADC) the successor

Bangladesh Agricultural Development Corporation (BADC) the successor

Bangladesh is primarily an agrarian economy. Agriculture is the single largest producing sector of  the economy since it comprises about 30% of the country’s GDP and employing around 60% of the total labor force.  The picture of Bangladesh which is full of profuse water, highly productive, green with plentiful corn is now variedly painted. How far a time was when our eyes goes so long get to see a tract of agricultural land. Now while the eye is known to hold only human habitation. Because reducing a part of cultivated land, habitation is created here & there. Its bad effects are going to dominate our food problem. The performance of this sector has an overwhelming impact on major macroeconomic objectives like employment generation, poverty alleviation, human resources development and food security. In view of the fact that agriculture is the backbone of our national economy, top-priority should be given for the development of our agriculture. All time any government of Bangladesh has undertaken various programmes for the improvement of agriculture. Bangladesh Agriculture is now in the process of transformation from subsistence farming into commercial farming. Bangladesh has already entered into the European Market for export of vegetables and other high-value crops.

Agricultural holdings in Bangladesh are generally small. Through Cooperatives, the use of modern machinery is gradually gaining popularity. Rice, Jute, Sugarcane, Potato, Pulses, Wheat, Tea and Tobacco are the principal crops. (BADC) the successor of the East Pakistan Agricultural Development Corporation, established under the Agricultural Development Corporation Ordinance, 1961 (E.P. Ordinance XXXVII of 1961). The crop sub-sector dominates the agriculture sector contributing about 72% of total production. Fisheries, livestock and forestry sub-sectors are 10.33%, 10.11% and 7.33% respectively. Crop diversification program, credit, extension and research, and input distribution policies pursued by the government are yielding positive results. The country is now on the threshold of attaining self-sufficiency in food grain production.